How to Organize a Homeschool Day

Having a well thought out plan for your homeschool day is imperative to having a peaceful home and homeschool. Finding a schedule and plan that works for your family doesn’t have to be difficult! Join Ashley Nielsen, a Vice President at The Good and the Beautiful as she explores a few simple principles and steps that are sure to help every single homeschool family with their homeschool schedules. To watch more helpful videos like this one, make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel. We have so much to share with you that we hope will encourage and bless your families!

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  • Barbara

    Though our homeschooling journey is just starting, this is something my husband and I have been praying and fasting over. We want this to succeed and all parties involved to be happy through the process.

    We have finally come up with something that we feel at peace about. We realize that this is what rings for our family. My brother and mothers homeschooling day looks completely different then what we came up with and we also know we will hear some opinions from my husband’s family who are stanch public schoolers… But that’s okay.

    We will school all year round, we both feel at peace with this and then we will take vacation at the same time my husband does… And if time is needed for life, like new baby, weddings, baptism, more time off for Christmas, etc. It will give us flexibility while still aloting an expectation that allows for us to see to our school year completed.

    Our day starts at a specific time with scriptures and prayer… Daddy goes to work and the rest of us sit down to a light breakfast and religious study. After that we switch to a check mark system… Some of my kids are morning people, some are night owls… So they can choose how they structure their day for the most part and as long as their stewardship is completed everyday, when they choose to do chores and school is up to them… But it has to come before free time

    We all take a break for lunch and 2 hours of quiet time. These happen at a set time… Older kids can read, craft, or some other quiet activity while the younger kids nap, and my brain can relax a little. Half time I guess you can say…

    When they wake its a family class then back to the check list, or if finished, free time until dinner… Dinner is a solid set time as well as a family class after. After that, free time till bed or finish up your list.

    Day 1 and 4 has LA, Math, and Science ( family class), f. Language ( family class), religious study ( family class), reading and their choice of elective

    Day 2 and 5 is LA, Math, History (family class), f. Language (family class), religious studies (family class) reading, and elective of choice

    day 3 is F. language ( family class), health ( family class), humanities (family class), handwriting, and homemaking ( family class 2 month)

    Its about 4 hrs a day of core stuff, with the average aloted time between 30-45 min for individual stuff and 30 or 60 min for family class.
    Electives can be PE ( 3hrs a week at least), music, arts and crafts , writing, more reading, hobbies, etc… But all core stuff must be completed

    Day 6 or daddy’s day off is cooking, two week evaluations parents/ child , and outing/ field trips.

    Seems complicated in writing but on the white board its neat and flows well thus far…

    I hope that everybody finds what works for them… I guess you can just say we use a hybrid of everything you discussed.

  • Addie

    Great video…thank you!

    We take time off in the summer, but actually begin our school year towards the end of July, so that we can finish up in April. In this way we can focus on getting the garden in and prepping the property and critters for summer production. We do 5 school days in 4, leaving the 5th day for sports, music lessons, etc. Oddly enough, my children rise early. They are up at 5:45 (their choice) in order to see their dad off to work and begin the school day. They prefer an early start, so they have more time for hobbies and work projects. I get up at 5, in order to be dressed and ready for the day, before they come down. The littlest guys are 5 and 7. They often sleep later, but everyone else, ages 9, 11, 13, and 14, wake on their own and start their school day independently. To be honest, I wish they’d sleep later (haha), but since my husband’s work schedule has him leaving at 6 and home by 4:30, our days are early to bed and early to rise.

  • Shannon

    Loved this! Thanks!

  • Abby

    This was not at all what I expected when I read the title, and I’m so grateful! Thank you for helping me feel validated in the way we organize our homeschool day and for helping me see that our organizational style is more common than I thought. This is the first time I’ve felt good after hearing about homeschool organization rather than defeated or like I’m doing it wrong because we’re not “typical”. It turns out what I thought was typical isn’t so typical after all.

  • Kelly

    I love these videos! We follow a traditional schedule for our school year normally, but because of some trips we’ve planned this year, we will only take 1 month off during the summer instead of 2 1/2. We are like you, all the friends and fun events are just too tempting to make school consistent during the summer.

    In the weeks to come, we are going to try doing chores in the morning before school rather than in the afternoon. A sense of accomplishment first thing in the morning may be helpful for us.