fbpx

How to Organize a Homeschool Day

Having a well thought out plan for your homeschool day is imperative to having a peaceful home and homeschool. Finding a schedule and plan that works for your family doesn’t have to be difficult! Join Ashley Nielsen, a Vice President at The Good and the Beautiful as she explores a few simple principles and steps that are sure to help every single homeschool family with their homeschool schedules. To watch more helpful videos like this one, make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel. We have so much to share with you that we hope will encourage and bless your families!

You may also like:

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published.

Comments

  • michael

    Would it be okay if we did a lesson every day of language arts? Or should I try to spread out each level over the course of a year so my child’s attention span/maturity can match the level?

    • The Good and the Beautiful

      We suggest four lessons per week to finish the course in one school year but we highly encourage families to adapt the courses and curriculum to their own child. If your child is ready to complete more work, there should not be any problem with them working at a faster pace. We hope you love the courses!

  • sara

    What a great video – so very helpful!! I am eager to design my own daily routine – or at least try a few with my children and see what works best for us. Thank you again for all the helpful suggestions!

  • We start each new school year in January. This gives me relief if we take too much time off. I take all subjects and divide them up by 12 months. This gives me a final goal we must complete by.

    For example, if language arts has 120 lesson, that’s 10 lessons a month. Therefore January we have to complete lesson 10. And by the last day of February we have to complete lesson 20. We are usually far ahead most of the year. When we get ahead, that gives us time to take off. I rarely have to say no to an unexpected play date or field trip.

    We struggle with morning routines and start time. We have no real schedule since covid. Bedtimes and wake times vary to extremes. After watching the video, I am Going to try to make 10am our start time. I’m thinking read aloud time with a cup of coffee. Follow with Math and language arts. Next will be the independent work, typing, handwriting, reading. I’d like to save history and science for evenings. Maybe just after dinner. Follow up with our night time routine. This will ensure we get plenty of day time for the pool, outings, or just chill out time.

  • Tara

    Thank you for your response. Since my last email, I have received my order. There are a few mistakes. How do I go about fixing the mix up, also a few books were missing, but highlighted on the order form, does this meaning it’s on bavk order? Nothing was explained.

    • Customer Support

      Thank you for your purchase, Tara! Please contact our customer support team for your specific order information at [email protected]. They will be happy to help you with your inquiry.

  • Mariah

    Are there recommendations for how long a child should spend on individual subjects each day as well as how long they should spend total on schooling each day? Recommendations for different ages would be great. I have seen conflicting information on the internet about how long children should spend on schoolwork each day, and would love to know what The Good and the Beautiful recommends.

    • Customer Support

      Hi Mariah! Welcome! First of all, we recommend that you determine what is required by your state. Different states have different standards as far as hours, days, weeks, etc. that students need to fulfill each school year. After that for younger children and lower level courses, we recommend that you follow your child’s lead. If you notice that your child is less able to focus or is starting to get fatigued, we recommend pausing the lesson for the day and resuming the next day. For upper level courses, we recommend that you work with the child to determine what is a good length of time to work on the lesson. Some lessons may take more than one day and some lessons may take less time and can be completed in one day. Because each child is different, we don’t offer concrete examples of how long to work on a lesson. Also, younger children will have fewer subjects to work on while older children will have more subjects, so a younger child will need less time for school than their older sibling.